Author: Same Burton

CERCA TALENT+ Is Wishing Everyone a Happy and Safe Fourth of July

As the Unites States pauses to reflect on its history, the ideals birthed at its inception, and the strength it projects around the world today, we want to take this time to reflect on the great strength we admire in the companies and candidates we work with and celebrate the upcoming success you will build in the remainder of this and all the years to follow. We are thankful to be a part of that.

So many of the ideals that went into forming our Great Nation and keep it strong are those we can all aspire to in our work. All of these and more will help continue to shape our success and make us ever stronger. And Bravery – to Persist Relentlessly – is one of the greatest. For us all, it could be said we will become and remain the premier organizations in our respective spaces as long as we are teams of the brave, devotedly doing more and going further to serve more deeply than those around us.

As we celebrate our Nation’s birthday, let us celebrate and then decide, together, to e

https://cercatalent.com/2020/cerca-talent-is-wishing-everyone-a-happy-and-safe-fourth-of-july/

Top 7+ Signs You About to Make a Hiring Mistake | Genomics Recruiter

Hiring a new employee is a time-consuming and expensive process that can make human resource and hiring managers feel pressured to cut corners just to get through it. While the frustration is understandable, simply checking the box is a poor approach. A bad hire ends up costing a company in numerous ways, including lost productivity, lost wages, lost revenue, damage to reputation, and having to go through the hiring process again when that employee quits or gets fired.

Here are a few common signs you are about to make hiring mistakes:
Going with Your Gut

There is a lot of talk about how people should trust their gut and go with their first impression. That might work in other areas of life, but it is rarely a good idea when it comes to hiring an employee. Whether a hiring manager personally likes a job candidate has no bearing on that individual having the right qualifications for the job or fitting into company culture. In the Genomics, Genetics, BioTech and Diagnostics Industries w

https://cercatalent.com/2020/top-7-signs-you-about-to-make-a-hiring-mistake-genomics-recruiter/

You’ve Been Downsized From Your Genomics or Genetics Diagnostics Company? Now what?

Oh my! You have just learned that your job has been eliminated or you’ve been demoted from your current role. This is all too common in the current crisis.

What do you do? First of all, try not to panic.

Downsizing does happen… but not to me, you say? First thing to do is take some deep breaths and move past the denial stage. Try to relax and put together an action plan. Just like anything else in life, you need to start taking steps to better your situation and get what you want.

There are a few “housekeeping” items you have to take care of straight away.
Collect Your Final Paycheck

Make sure that you know when you will receive your last paycheck, and how it will be delivered to you. Some states require employers pay it immediately; others may allow a short time lag. Make sure you get everything that is due to you.

Entitlements could include monies for overtime, back pay, accrued vacation, or sick leave. Talk to the appropriate person in your HR department to learn what y

https://cercatalent.com/2020/youve-been-downsized-from-your-genomics-or-genetics-diagnostics-company-now-what/

Who Is Dr. Sabine Hazan

Who Is Dr. Sabine Hazan

Dr. Sabine Hazan and ProgenaBiome

Dr. Sabine Hazan, Our Start!

Born in Morocco, Dr. Sabine Hazan has always been dedicated to understanding life. She sought a career in medicine and was accepted to medical school based on outstanding research on obesity conducted as an undergraduate. She completed her residency at the University of Miami during the peak of the HIV epidemic, treating extremely ill patients at Jackson Memorial Hospital and in the local jail. There, she was awarded two prizes for her research. After completing her residency, Dr. Hazan became the first woman gastroenterology fellow at the University of Florida. There, she completed a year of research and presented her findings in poster format at the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) National Meeting. It was at that moment that she was approached by the esteemed Dr. Neil Stollman. He told her that the future of medicine lies in the microbiome. For her exceptional work with visceral hyperalgesia she was awarded the Dean’s Research Award. Dr. Stollman is now an expert and leader on fecal transplant and Clostridioidesdifficile (C.diff) and serves on the governing board of the ACG.

Following her fellowship, Dr. Hazan returned to Montreal and opened a practice in upstate New York. Her work there consisted of 10 percent research and 90 percent private gastroenterology patients and brought many patients from across the border in Canada. She was the only female gastroenterologist in an 80-mile radius, and the influx of Canadian patients brought to light for her the problems with socialized medicine in Canada. These patients faced intolerable wait times for a visit with a gastroenterologist in Canada, and so visited Dr. Hazan in New York. After meeting with the Prime Minister of Health, Dr. Hazan helped bring about a dual system in Canada, in which private practices co-exist with socialized medicine. Her years of practice as a solo woman gastroenterologist brought her under the microscope on numerous occasions, facing scrutiny not encountered by her male colleagues. 

After the birth of her two children, Dr. Hazan and her husband Dr. Alon Steinberg moved to California. There, she joined her sister, Dr. Lydie Hazan, at Axis Today Clinical Trials as a Sub-Investigator, and began doing clinical trial research in California for the company in Beverly Hills. She also joined a medical group as a private practitioner in Ventura. However, her desire for innovation led her to establish thriving private practices in Malibu, Thousand Oaks, and Ventura. Still desiring to understand life, she started her own clinical trial company 16 years ago, Ventura Clinical Trials, and has been Principal Investigator and Sub Investigator in over 150 clinical trials. Many of these trials were for Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI), enough that through her impressive recruitment she became known as the Queen of C. difficile in the clinical trial community. When her patients with C.diff did not respond to traditional or clinical trial therapies, she resorted to treatment with fecal microbiota transplant. 

During her extensive clinical trial experience, Dr. Hazan observed how dramatically the microbiome can impact human health. Over the years, she followed the wise words of Dr. Stollman and explored the path of FMT. She observed that FMT has the power to cure more than C.diff infection, as she saw patients with Crohn’s, psoriasis, Alzheimer’s, and even cancer improve following transplant. Naturally, this dedicated scientist wanted to better understand the mechanism behind what she was seeing in her patients. She conducted extensive research, which led her to Dr. Sydney Finegold, an infectious disease specialist, who was also focused on the microbiome and its relationship to disease, particularly Autism. He told her that the answer lies in the bacteria of the gut, and that sequencing the microbiome to identify those bacteria was the answer. He advised her to acquire a next-generation sequencer and conduct studies using whole-genome shotgun sequencing to examine the mysteries of the microbiome.

As her clinical trial work continued, Dr. Hazan found that Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) was increasingly juxtaposed to her studies. While being a top recruiter for studies, she also treated two Crohn’s patients who developed CDI and required FMT. As the patients experienced symptom relief post-FMT,  Dr. Hazan discovered that FMT allowed her to improve their Crohn’s and restore the balance of their microbiome. Wanting to better understand how this was possible, she reached out to Dr. Thomas Borody, a pioneer researcher and father of modern FMT in the 1980s. 1984 Borody established the Centre for Digestive Diseases (CDD) in Sydney, Australia and has overseen its growth into an active clinical research institute with 65 employees. In 1985, Borody pioneered the first effective triple antibiotic therapy for Helicobater pylori, which had a profound impact on curing  hundreds of patients of their peptic ulcers. His clinic has completed close to 30,000 FMT treatments, and he has filed over 165 patents. The meeting between Dr. Borody and Dr. Hazan proved to be the beginning of a great collaborative relationship.

While the Woolsey fire ravaged southern California, Dr. Hazan received a call from the family of Dr. Finegold, to inform her that she would receive all his papers and books in hopes to continue his work on Autism. Continuing his legacy, she established a new company, ProgenaBiome™,  in January 2019 to investigate the microbiome. ProgenaBiome™ is a state-of-the-art genetic research sequencing laboratory with next-generation whole genome shotgun sequencing capabilities on-site as per Dr. Sydney Finegold’s recommendations. To run this incredible laboratory, Dr. Hazan brought on board Dr. Andreas Papoutsis, a brilliant scientist with extensive experience in assay development and next-generation sequencing. He researched and investigated new technologies for the analysis of BRCA-1, one of the genes associated with breast cancer, CART-19, a therapy for blood cancers, and T-cell receptors. Under his directorship the lab has officially launched with efficient workflow and meticulous processing. 

Through her groundbreaking work, Dr. Hazan has earned the respect and admiration of her colleagues, many of whom have joined her in the quest for a healthcare revolution and helped her create the Malibu MIcrobiome Meeting. While she is working to bring medicine to new frontiers, she believes there will always be a place for pharmaceutical clinical trials, naturopaths, nutritionists, and additional work on the microbiome. She believes that the answers will come not through competition, but rather through collaboration by all fields. Just as the post office still exists, decades after the development of e-mail, better understanding of the microbiome does not eliminate the need for other facets of medicine. She also believes in patient choice; that patients should be able to choose quality of life over quantity if they so desire and have the right to try any treatment of their choosing.

Dr. Hazan has been invited to speak all over the world, including at the Microbiome Congress and NIST. She is working with both to ensure that data generated by ProgenaBiome™ is valid, verified, and reproducible, which she believes can only be achieved through ethical research.

Dr. Hazan is a firm believer that disease can only be understood through precision medicine by focusing on the individual and the changes within. Much like each person has unique fingerprints, no two people have the same microbiome. She also believes in the importance of assessing disease by looking at family. Her overall goal is to understand the microbes that allow us to function, from those we are born with to those that will decompose us when we die. She hopes that her quest for individual microbiome understanding leads to an awareness we are simply a diverse collection of microbes, working together to shape the world.

For more: progenabiome.com / Twitter / Facebook / LinkedIn

Dr. Sabine Hazan & ProgenaBiome

Dr. Sabine Hazan & ProgenaBiome

Dr. Sabine Hazan, Our Start!

Born in Morocco, Dr. Sabine Hazan has always been dedicated to understanding life. She sought a career in medicine and was accepted to medical school based on outstanding research on obesity conducted as an undergraduate. She completed her residency at the University of Miami during the peak of the HIV epidemic, treating extremely ill patients at Jackson Memorial Hospital and in the local jail. There, she was awarded two prizes for her research. After completing her residency, Dr. Hazan became the first woman gastroenterology fellow at the University of Florida. There, she completed a year of research and presented her findings in poster format at the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) National Meeting. It was at that moment that she was approached by the esteemed Dr. Neil Stollman. He told her that the future of medicine lies in the microbiome. For her exceptional work with visceral hyperalgesia she was awarded the Dean’s Research Award. Dr. Stollman is now an expert and leader on fecal transplant and Clostridioidesdifficile (C.diff) and serves on the governing board of the ACG.

Following her fellowship, Dr. Hazan returned to Montreal and opened a practice in upstate New York. Her work there consisted of 10 percent research and 90 percent private gastroenterology patients and brought many patients from across the border in Canada. She was the only female gastroenterologist in an 80-mile radius, and the influx of Canadian patients brought to light for her the problems with socialized medicine in Canada. These patients faced intolerable wait times for a visit with a gastroenterologist in Canada, and so visited Dr. Hazan in New York. After meeting with the Prime Minister of Health, Dr. Hazan helped bring about a dual system in Canada, in which private practices co-exist with socialized medicine. Her years of practice as a solo woman gastroenterologist brought her under the microscope on numerous occasions, facing scrutiny not encountered by her male colleagues. 

After the birth of her two children, Dr. Hazan and her husband Dr. Alon Steinberg moved to California. There, she joined her sister, Dr. Lydie Hazan, at Axis Today Clinical Trials as a Sub-Investigator, and began doing clinical trial research in California for the company in Beverly Hills. She also joined a medical group as a private practitioner in Ventura. However, her desire for innovation led her to establish thriving private practices in Malibu, Thousand Oaks, and Ventura. Still desiring to understand life, she started her own clinical trial company 16 years ago, Ventura Clinical Trials, and has been Principal Investigator and Sub Investigator in over 150 clinical trials. Many of these trials were for Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI), enough that through her impressive recruitment she became known as the Queen of C. difficile in the clinical trial community. When her patients with C.diff did not respond to traditional or clinical trial therapies, she resorted to treatment with fecal microbiota transplant. 

During her extensive clinical trial experience, Dr. Hazan observed how dramatically the microbiome can impact human health. Over the years, she followed the wise words of Dr. Stollman and explored the path of FMT. She observed that FMT has the power to cure more than C.diff infection, as she saw patients with Crohn’s, psoriasis, Alzheimer’s, and even cancer improve following transplant. Naturally, this dedicated scientist wanted to better understand the mechanism behind what she was seeing in her patients. She conducted extensive research, which led her to Dr. Sydney Finegold, an infectious disease specialist, who was also focused on the microbiome and its relationship to disease, particularly Autism. He told her that the answer lies in the bacteria of the gut, and that sequencing the microbiome to identify those bacteria was the answer. He advised her to acquire a next-generation sequencer and conduct studies using whole-genome shotgun sequencing to examine the mysteries of the microbiome.

As her clinical trial work continued, Dr. Hazan found that Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) was increasingly juxtaposed to her studies. While being a top recruiter for studies, she also treated two Crohn’s patients who developed CDI and required FMT. As the patients experienced symptom relief post-FMT,  Dr. Hazan discovered that FMT allowed her to improve their Crohn’s and restore the balance of their microbiome. Wanting to better understand how this was possible, she reached out to Dr. Thomas Borody, a pioneer researcher and father of modern FMT in the 1980s. 1984 Borody established the Centre for Digestive Diseases (CDD) in Sydney, Australia and has overseen its growth into an active clinical research institute with 65 employees. In 1985, Borody pioneered the first effective triple antibiotic therapy for Helicobater pylori, which had a profound impact on curing  hundreds of patients of their peptic ulcers. His clinic has completed close to 30,000 FMT treatments, and he has filed over 165 patents. The meeting between Dr. Borody and Dr. Hazan proved to be the beginning of a great collaborative relationship.

While the Woolsey fire ravaged southern California, Dr. Hazan received a call from the family of Dr. Finegold, to inform her that she would receive all his papers and books in hopes to continue his work on Autism. Continuing his legacy, she established a new company, ProgenaBiome™,  in January 2019 to investigate the microbiome. ProgenaBiome™ is a state-of-the-art genetic research sequencing laboratory with next-generation whole genome shotgun sequencing capabilities on-site as per Dr. Sydney Finegold’s recommendations. To run this incredible laboratory, Dr. Hazan brought on board Dr. Andreas Papoutsis, a brilliant scientist with extensive experience in assay development and next-generation sequencing. He researched and investigated new technologies for the analysis of BRCA-1, one of the genes associated with breast cancer, CART-19, a therapy for blood cancers, and T-cell receptors. Under his directorship the lab has officially launched with efficient workflow and meticulous processing. 

Through her groundbreaking work, Dr. Hazan has earned the respect and admiration of her colleagues, many of whom have joined her in the quest for a healthcare revolution and helped her create the Malibu MIcrobiome Meeting. While she is working to bring medicine to new frontiers, she believes there will always be a place for pharmaceutical clinical trials, naturopaths, nutritionists, and additional work on the microbiome. She believes that the answers will come not through competition, but rather through collaboration by all fields. Just as the post office still exists, decades after the development of e-mail, better understanding of the microbiome does not eliminate the need for other facets of medicine. She also believes in patient choice; that patients should be able to choose quality of life over quantity if they so desire and have the right to try any treatment of their choosing.

Dr. Hazan has been invited to speak all over the world, including at the Microbiome Congress and NIST. She is working with both to ensure that data generated by ProgenaBiome™ is valid, verified, and reproducible, which she believes can only be achieved through ethical research.

Dr. Hazan is a firm believer that disease can only be understood through precision medicine by focusing on the individual and the changes within. Much like each person has unique fingerprints, no two people have the same microbiome. She also believes in the importance of assessing disease by looking at family. Her overall goal is to understand the microbes that allow us to function, from those we are born with to those that will decompose us when we die. She hopes that her quest for individual microbiome understanding leads to an awareness we are simply a diverse collection of microbes, working together to shape the world.

For more: progenabiome.com / Twitter / Facebook / LinkedIn

Contact: Stephanie Davis, marketing@progenabiome.com

Top 6 Surefire Ways to Hire the Wrong Genetics or Genomics Salesperson – CERCA Talent Home

1. Taking Too Long to Make the Hire

A search for the best candidate in the marketplace should include a sense of urgency. This is especially the case when the market for top talent is a candidate’s market and a candidate has the choice of several top job openings. Here’s a scenario:

A prime candidate is interviewing with four different companies, including yours. All four companies are interested in that candidate.

Now, ask yourself who has more options: the candidate or your company? The answer is obvious. Therefore, it’s imperative that once an A-level applicant has been presented, the hiring process should move along briskly. A sensible timeframe is between two and four weeks. If the process takes any longer the risk of losing that top person to another company rises dramatically.

Please read full article –>

https://cercatalent.com/2020/top-6-surefire-ways-to-hire-the-wrong-genetics-or-genomics-salesperson/

The TOP Reason New Hires Fail

According to the results of a study published in Forbes Magazine, 46 percent of new employees in professional positions quit or are fired from their job within the first 18 months. That statistic is alarming enough on its own, especially in this crisis. What is even more surprising is the reason for the failure.

It would be natural to assume the high rate of new hire failure would be due to a lack of professional skills. However, that was only the case 11 percent of the time. The rest did not make the cut due to their attitude. Perhaps even more disheartening, only 19 percent of those who remain in their position are expected to be truly successful at it.

Read full article

https://cercatalent.com/2020/the-top-reason-new-hires-fail/

This will change healthcare and make us more aware of our gut microbiome

Dr. Sabine Hazan-Steinberg and the the microbiome

This data will change healthcare and make us more aware of our gut microbiome

Progenabiome, a physician-owned genetic sequencing laboratory, found cutting-edge data on Clostridium difficile (C.diff), a disease burdening 500,000+ Americans yearly. They will present a validated, verified, and reproduced C.diff Assay at The American College of Gastroenterology (ACG) 2019 Annual Scientific Meeting on Monday, Oct. 28, 2019 in San Antonio.

Progenabiome, a genetic sequencing laboratory of the gut flora. Leading the way into the FUTURE by understanding the microbiome NOW. The quest for a new healthcare revolution!
Progenabiome, a genetic sequencing laboratory of the gut flora. Leading the way into the FUTURE by understanding the microbiome NOW. The quest for a new healthcare revolution!

“This data will change healthcare and make us more aware of our gut microbiome,” said Dr. Sabine Hazan-Steinberg, CEO and Founder of Progenabiome. “2500 years later, we’re proving Hippocrates right…everything starts in the gut.”

Dr. Hazan, a Malibu-based gastroenterologist, has 20+ years experience leading clinical trials, many for C.diff. When trials failed, she used fecal microbiota transplant (FMT), following advice from friend Dr. Neil Stollman, gastroenterologist at UCSF and East Bay Center for Digestive Health. She also followed great work by Dr. Thomas Borody, FMT pioneer and Centre for Digestive Diseases founder. Success post-FMT for recurrent C.diff suggested the microbiome holds many answers.

Knowing the C.diff microbe has existed for 10 million years, she questioned why it now takes 50,000 lives annually.

Dr. Sydney Finegold, infectious disease specialist who researched Autism/microbiome for 50 years, recommended she acquire a next-generation sequencer. When he passed in 2018, his books went to Hazan, hoping she could continue his legacy.

In January, she joined pathologist Dr. Brad Barrows and scientific director Dr. Andreas Papoutsis to launch Progenabiome. Their first run found non-toxigenic C.diff in every sample, including those not diagnosed with the disease. Preliminary data shows the C.diff microbe is not transmitted hand-to-mouth as previously believed. It is already in the gut and becomes toxic when something ingested triggers it.

Progenabiome will present this groundbreaking discovery at ACG 2019 (Poster 1027 / Booth 1931) and the 7th Annual International C.diff Conference November 6-7, 2019 in St. Louis.

Progenabiome is investigating the role of the gut flora in various diseases through 11 studies overlooked by New England IRB. Progenabiome’s Mission: to better understand, prevent, and treat diseases by analyzing specific genetic codes of 40 trillion gut microbes. Dr. Hazan believes the art of Medicine lies in our ability to see outside the box and recognize that all microbes and humans are unique.

For more: progenabiome.com / Twitter / Facebook / LinkedIn

Contact: Stephanie Davis, marketing@progenabiome.com

Top 6 Things Your Future Self Wants You To Start Doing… TODAY!

Life comes at you so fast sometimes it’s hard to contemplate the future. This recent pandemic we are all trying to emerge stronger from is a striking example of the premise.

Now, more than ever, “If you don’t plan to succeed, you plan to fail.” You can’t afford to just drift through life. Your future self may someday look back at how you lived during this time and wonder, “What the heck were you thinking?” Be intentional about crafting a better life, today and tomorrow.

Here are six things your future self wants you to starting doing today.

read full article —->>>

https://cercatalent.com/2020/6-things-your-future-self-wants-you-to-start-doing-today-2/

Top 10 Ways to Invest Your Genomics and Diagnostics Recruiting Budget

We will soon be emerging from lockdown, and while there may be a few more available candidates for your open roles, there is no getting around the fact you must effectively manage your money to recruit the highest-quality job applicants. Your organization can save considerable cash on recruitment costs by engaging in creative, outside-the-box thinking. We offer these 10 best practices below for finding the candidates your company desires without breaking your recruitment budget. Read full article here –>>

https://cercatalent.com/2020/10-top-ways-to-invest-your-genomics-and-diagnostics-recruiting-budget/